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RFC 3699: Gap

RFC 3699 is currently a gap.

This means, that there is currently RFC with number 3699, but this may not be final.

There are three different publishing-states of RFC-documents:

  • Gap: It means, that there is currently no RFC document with number 3699, but there may be one in the future. That is: There is no final decision, yet. See Index of known RFC Gaps for a list of RFC numbers, that are currently unused, but might be used in the future.
  • Not issued: It means, that there is no RFC document with number 3699, and there never will be. That is: It has been decided not to publish RFC 3699. See Index of not issued RFC numbers for a list of RFC numbers, that are used, and will not be used in the future.
  • Issued: This is the usual publishing state and means, that a RFC document with number 3699 is available and published. See Index of RFC documents for a list of RFC documents.

What is the main difference between "gap" and "not issued"?

A "not issued"-RFC-document is not available at the moment and there never will be a document with this number. It might be, that the document was never finished or that the document was already obsolete before it had been published and publishing was skipped. But its number was already taken and can not be reused. Note, if a RFC document is issued, it remains so. It might be, that the document is updated or even obsoleted by a later one. Nevertheless the issued document remains, just its document-state might change.

A "gap"-RFC-document is not available at the moment. It might be, that the document is dropped, but decision has not been made officially, or that the document is just not yet completed or published. That means, even if - say RFC 3699 - is currently a gap, there might be a RFC document with number 3699 in the works and might be published.

What to do with a gap document?

There is nothing, you can do at the moment. But as long the gap number is not moved to the Not issued RFC numbers, it might be published in the future. Hence, just check from time to time either the Index of known RFC Gaps, if RFC 3699 is still a gap, or the Index of RFC documents, if RFC 3699 was published meanwhile.

 
 
 

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